Government Programs and Schemes
Atal Pension Yojana
Launch Date: May 9, 2015
Ministry: Ministry of Finance
Sector: Pension
The Government of India is concerned about the old age income security of the working poor and is focused on encouraging and enabling them to save for their retirement. To address the longevity risks among the workers inunorganized sector and to encourage the workers in unorganized sector to voluntarily save for their retirement
  • The GoI has therefore announced a new scheme called Atal Pension Yojana (APY)1 in 2015-16 budget. The APY is focussed on all citizens in the unorganized sector.
  • The scheme is administered by the Pension Fund Regulatory and Development Authority (PFRDA) through NPS architecture.
  • Under the APY, there is guaranteed minimum monthly pension for the subscribers ranging between Rs. 1000 and Rs. 5000 per month.
  • The benefit of minimum pension would be guaranteed by the GoI.
  • GoI will also co-contribute 50% of the subscriber’scontribution or Rs. 1000 per annum, whichever is lower. Government co-contribution is available for those who are not covered by any Statutory Social Security Schemes and is not income tax payer
  • GoI will co-contribute to each eligible subscriber, for a period of 5 years who joins the scheme between the period 1st June, 2015 to 31st December, 2015. The benefit of five years of government Co-contributionunder APY would not exceed 5 years for all subscribers including migrated Swavalamban beneficiaries.
  • All bank account holders may join APY.
Eligiblity
  • APY is applicable to all citizen of India aged between 18-40 years
  • Aadhaar will be the primary KYC. Aadhar and mobile number are recommended to be obtained from subscribers for the ease of operation of the scheme. If not available at the time of registration, Aadhar details may also be submitted later stage
Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT)
Providing basic services (e.g. water supply, sewerage, urban transport) to households and build amenities in cities which will improve the quality of life for all, especially the poor and the disadvantaged is a national priority.

The purpose of Atal Mission for Rejuvenation and Urban Transformation (AMRUT) is to
  • Ensure that every household has access to a tap with the assured supply of water and a sewerage connection.
  • Increase the amenity value of cities by developing greenery and well maintained open spaces (e.g. parks) and
  • Reduce pollution by switching to public transport or constructing facilities for non-motorized transport (e.g. walking and cycling). All these outcomes are valued by citizens, particularly women, and indicators and standards have been prescribed by the Ministry of Housing and Urban Affairs (MoHUA ) in the form of Service Level Benchmarks (SLBs).
Components
  • Water Supply
  • Sewerage
  • Storm water drainage
  • Urban Transport
  • Green Space/parks
Coverage Five hundred cities have been selected under AMRUT. The category of cities that have been selected under AMRUT is given as:
  • All Cities and Towns with a population of over one lakh with notified Municipalities as per Census 2011, including Cantonment Boards (Civilian areas),
  • All Capital Cities/Towns of States/ UTs, not covered in above ,
  • All Cities/ Towns classified as Heritage Cities by MoHUA under the HRIDAY Scheme,
  • Thirteen Cities and Towns on the stem of the main rivers with a population above 75,000 and less than 1 lakh, and
  • Ten Cities from hill states, islands and tourist destinations (not more than one from each State).
Antyodaya Anna Yojana
AAY was a step in the direction of making TPDS aim at reducing hunger among the poorest segments of the BPL population. A National Sample Survey Exercise pointed towards the fact that about 5% of the total population in the country sleeps without two square meals a day. This section of the population could be called as "hungry”. In order to make TPDS more focused and targeted towards this category of population, the "Antyodaya Anna Yojana” (AAY) was launched in December, 2000 for one crore poorest of the poor families.

AAY involved identification of one crore poorest of the poor families from amongst the number of BPL families covered under TPDS within the States and providing them food grains at a highly subsidized rate of Rs.2/- per kg. for wheat and Rs.3/- per kg for rice. The States/UTs were required to bear the distribution cost, including margin to dealers and retailers as well as the transportation cost. Thus the entire food subsidy was passed on to the consumers under the scheme.

The scale of issue that was initially 25 kg per family per month was increased to 35 kg per family per month with effect from 1st April 2002.

The AAY Scheme has since expanded to cover 2.50 crore poorest of the poor households as follows:

The AAY Scheme was expanded in 2003-04 by adding another 50 lakh BPL households headed by widows or terminally ill persons or disabled persons or persons aged 60 years or more with no assured means of subsistence or societal support. Order to this effect was issued on 3rd June, 2003. With this increase, 1.5 crore (i.e. 23% of BPL) families were covered under the AAY.

As announced in the Union Budget 2004-05, the AAY was further expanded by another 50 lakh BPL families by including, inter alia, all households at the risk of hunger. Order to this effect was issued on 3rd August 2004. In order to identify these households, the guidelines stipulated the following criteria:-a) Landless agriculture labourers, marginal farmers, rural artisans /craftsmen, such as potters, tanners, weavers, blacksmiths, carpenters, slum dwellers and persons earning their livelihood on daily basis in the informal sector like porters, coolies, rickshaw pullers, hand cart pullers, fruit and flower sellers, snake charmers, rag pickers, cobblers, destitute and other similar categories in both rural and urban areas.b) Households headed by widows or terminally ill persons/disabled persons/ persons aged 60 years or more with no assured means of subsistence or societal support.c) Widows or terminally ill persons or disabled persons or persons aged 60 years or more or single women or single men with no family or societal support or assured means of subsistence.d) All primitive tribal households.

As announced in the Union Budget 2005-06, the AAY was expanded to cover another 50 lakh BPL households thus increasing its coverage to 2.5 crore households (i.e. 38% of BPL). Order to this effect was issued on 12th May, 2005.
Ayushman Bharat Yojana
Ayushman Bharat, a flagship scheme of Government of India, was launched as recommended by the National Health Policy 2017, to achieve the vision of Universal Health Coverage (UHC). This initiative has been designed to meet Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and its underlining commitment, which is to "leave no one behind."

Ayushman Bharat is an attempt to move from sectoral and segmented approach of health service delivery to a comprehensive need-based health care service. This scheme aims to undertake path breaking interventions to holistically address the healthcare system (covering prevention, promotion and ambulatory care) at the primary, secondary and tertiary level. Ayushman Bharat adopts a continuum of care approach, comprising of two inter-related components, which are -
  • Health and Wellness Centres (HWCs)
  • Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PM-JAY)
Health and Wellness Centers (HWCs)
In February 2018, the Government of India announced the creation of 1,50,000 Health and Wellness Centres (HWCs) by transforming the existing Sub Centres and Primary Health Centres. These centres are to deliver Comprehensive Primary Health Care (CPHC) bringing healthcare closer to the homes of people. They cover both, maternal and child health services and non-communicable diseases, including free essential drugs and diagnostic services.

Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojana (PM-JAY)
The second component under Ayushman Bharat is the Pradhan Mantri Jan Arogya Yojna or PM-JAY as it is popularly known. This scheme was launched on 23rd September, 2018 in Ranchi, Jharkhand by the Hon’ble Prime Minister of India, Shri Narendra Modi.

Ayushman Bharat PM-JAY is the largest health assurance scheme in the world which aims at providing a health cover of Rs. 5 lakhs per family per year for secondary and tertiary care hospitalization to over 10.74 crores poor and vulnerable families (approximately 50 crore beneficiaries) that form the bottom 40% of the Indian population. The households included are based on the deprivation and occupational criteria of Socio-Economic Caste Census 2011 (SECC 2011) for rural and urban areas respectively. PM-JAY was earlier known as the National Health Protection Scheme (NHPS) before being rechristened. It subsumed the then existing Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana (RSBY) which had been launched in 2008. The coverage mentioned under PM-JAY, therefore, also includes families that were covered in RSBY but are not present in the SECC 2011 database. PM-JAY is fully funded by the Government and cost of implementation is shared between the Central and State Governments.
Key Features of PM-JAY
  • PM-JAY is the world’s largest health insurance/ assurance scheme fully financed by the government.
  • It provides a cover of Rs. 5 lakhs per family per year for secondary and tertiary care hospitalization across public and private empanelled hospitals in India.
  • Over 10.74 crore poor and vulnerable entitled families (approximately 50 crore beneficiaries) are eligible for these benefits.
  • PM-JAY provides cashless access to health care services for the beneficiary at the point of service, that is, the hospital.
  • It covers up to 3 days of pre-hospitalization and 15 days post-hospitalization expenses such as diagnostics and medicines.
  • PM-JAY envisions to help mitigate catastrophic expenditure on medical treatment which pushes nearly 6 crore Indians into poverty each year.
  • There is no restriction on the family size, age or gender.
  • All pre–existing conditions are covered from day one.
  • Benefits of the scheme are portable across the country i.e. a beneficiary can visit any empanelled public or private hospital in India to avail cashless treatment.
  • Services include approximately 1,393 procedures covering all the costs related to treatment, including but not limited to drugs, supplies, diagnostic services, physician's fees, room charges, surgeon charges, OT and ICU charges etc.
  • Public hospitals are reimbursed for the healthcare services at par with the private hospitals.
Benefit Cover Under PM-JAY
Benefit cover under various Government-funded health insurance schemes in India have always been structured on an upper ceiling limit ranging from an annual cover of INR30,000 to INR3,00,000 per family across various States which created a fragmented system. PM-JAY provides cashless cover of up to INR5,00,000 to each eligible family per annum for listed secondary and tertiary care conditions. The cover under the scheme includes all expenses incurred on the following components of the treatment.
  • Medical examination, treatment and consultation
  • Pre-hospitalization
  • Medicine and medical consumables
  • Non-intensive and intensive care services
  • Diagnostic and laboratory investigations
  • Medical implantation services (where necessary)
  • Accommodation benefits
  • Food services
  • Complications arising during treatment
  • Post-hospitalization follow-up care up to 15 days
The benefits of INR 5,00,000 are on a family floater basis which means that it can be used by one or all members of the family. The RSBY had a family cap of five members. However, based on learnings from those schemes, PM-JAY has been designed in such a way that there is no cap on family size or age of members. In addition, pre-existing diseases are covered from the very first day. This means that any eligible person suffering from any medical condition before being covered by PM-JAY will now be able to get treatment for all those medical conditions as well under this scheme right from the day they are enrolled.
Central Government Health Scheme
Central Government Health Scheme is providing comprehensive medical care to the Central Government employees and pensioners enrolled under the scheme. In fact CGHS caters to the healthcare needs of eligible beneficiaries covering all four pillars of democratic set up in India namely Legislature, Judiciary, Executive and Press. CGHS is the model Health care facility provider for Central Government employees & Pensioners and is unique of its kind due to the large volume of beneficiary base, and open ended generous approach of providing health care.

Presently approximately 35 lakh beneficiaries are covered by CGHS in 71 cities all over India and the endeavour is to include more cities to improve the accessibility of the services.
CGHS provides health care through following systems of Medicine
  1. Allopathic
  2. Homoeopathic
  3. Indian system of medicine
    • Ayurveda
    • Unani
    • Siddha
    • Yoga
Eligibility for Joining CGHS
All the following persons are eligible for CGHS facilities
1. All Central Government employees paid from the Central Civil Estimates (except Railways and Delhi Administration), including their dependant family members residing in CGHS covered areas.
2. Pensioners of Central Government (except pensioners belonging to Railways and the Armed Forces) and their families.
3. Central Government Pensioners retiring with Contributory Provident Fund benefits and their families.
4. Widows of Central Government pensioners, in receipt of family pension.
5. Delhi Police personnel and their families, in Delhi only.
6. Railway Board employees.
7. Civilian employees of Defence paid from Defence Service Estimates.
8. Child drawing pension on death of a Central Government employee including minor brothers and sisters of such child.
9. Ex-Governors and Lt. Governors and their families.
10. Ex-Vice Presidents and their families.
11. Central Government servants who are deputed to semi-government and autonomous bodies receiving substantial grant from, or financed by the Central Government.
12. Central Govt. employees on deputation to statutory or autonomous during the period of deputation.
13. Military Officers while on deputation to civil departments and getting their emoluments from Central Civil Estimates.
14. Families of Governments servants transferred to a non-CGHS area, for a maximum period of six months on deposit of CGHS contribution (for the period of 6 months) in advance.
15. Families of IAS Officers on North-Eastern Cadre, who continue to stay back in Delhi even after repatriation of the IAS Officer to the North-Eastern Cadre, provided that they continue to occupy Government accommodation in Delhi or New Delhi, on deposit of CGHS contribution in advance (one to three years). The same also applies to families of IAS Officers of J&K Cadre.
16. Parliamentary Secretaries of the Central Government and their families.
17. Members of Parliament and their families.
18. Ex-Members of Parliament.
19. Sitting Judges of Supreme Court and High Court of Delhi and former Judges of Supreme Court and High Courts.
20. Work Charged and Industrial Staff working in establishments run by various Ministries or Departments of Central Government, immediately from the date of their joining the service.
21. Employees of Kendriya Vidyalays Sangathan stationed at Delhi and NCR, Kolkata, Chennai, Hyderabad, Mumbai and Bengaluru.
22. Employees of Ordnance Factory Board Headquarters, Kolkata and Ordnance Equipment Factories Headquarters, Kanpur.
23. All India Service pensioners who retire while serving under the State at their option.
24. Freedom Fighters and members of their family receiving Central Pension under the Swatantrata Sainik Samman Pension Scheme.
25. Family members of the Deceased Ex-Members of Parliament.
26. Pensioners of Ordnance factories.
27. Members of Staff Side of the National Council of the Joint Consultative Machinery, even though not serving as Central Government employees.
28. Persons employed in semi-government and autonomous bodies who are permitted to join the CGH Scheme.
29. An Accredited Journalist who produces a certificate from the Press Council of India stating that he is a member of the Press Association, New Delhi (for OPD and at RML Hospital).
30. Retired Divisional Accountants of the Indian Audit and Accounts Department and those whose pay and pension are entirely borne by the State governments.
31. PSU absorbees who had commuted 100 percent of their pension and have been restored one third portion of their pension after 15 years.
32. Absorbees of Statutory Bodies or Autonomous Bodies of Central Govt. (including those who proceeded on deputation initially or were on deemed deputation and then absorbed), who are in receipt of Central Civil Pension.
33. Serving and retired Railway Audit Staff.
34. Serving and retired Divisional Accounts Officers and Divisional Accountants posted in the Office of Accountant Generals in States.
35. CISF personnel (and their families) and CAPF (Central Armed Police Forces) personnel posted in CGHS cities.
36. Employees of Supreme Court Legal Services Committee.
37. Employees of India Pharmacopoeia Commission, and their families.
38. Family and dependent members of a Central Govt. employee (a CGHS beneficiary) who stay back in CGHS covered area after posting of the employee to N.E. region (including Sikkim), Andaman and Nicobar Lakshadweep or Ladakh region and CAPF personnel posted in Left Wing Extremist areas, on payment of annual CGHS contribution in advance.
39. Defence Industrial Employees of Naval Dockyard Central Ordnance Depot and AFMSD, in Mumbai.

Facilities available under CGHS
  • OPD Treatment including issue of medicines.
  • Specialist Consultation at Polyclinic/Govt. Hospitals.
  • Indoor Treatment at Government and Empanelled Hospitals.
  • Investigations at Government and Empanelled Diagnostic centers.
  • Cashless facility available for treatment in empanelled hospitals and diagnostic centers for Pensioners and other identified beneficiaries.
  • Reimbursement of expenses for treatment availed in Govt. /Private Hospitals under emergency.
  • Reimbursement of expenses incurred for purchase of hearing aids, artificial limbs, appliances etc. as specified.
  • Family Welfare, Maternity and Child Health Services.
  • Medical consultation and dispensing of medicines in Ayurveda, Homeopathy, Unani and Siddha system of medicines (AYUSH)
DEENDAYAL ANTYODAYA YOJANA - NRLM
Aajeevika - National Rural Livelihoods Mission (NRLM) was launched by the Ministry of Rural Development (MoRD), Government of India in June 2011.

Aided in part through investment support by the World Bank, the Mission aims at creating efficient and effective institutional platforms of the rural poor, enabling them to increase household income through sustainable livelihood enhancements and improved access to financial services.

NRLM set out with an agenda to cover 7 Crore rural poor households, across 600 districts, 6000 blocks, 2.5 lakh Gram Panchayats and 6 lakh villages in the country through self-managed Self Help Groups (SHGs) and federated institutions and support them for livelihoods collectives in a period of 8-10 years.

In addition, the poor would be facilitated to achieve increased access to rights, entitlements and public services, diversified risk and better social indicators of empowerment. DAY-NRLM believes in harnessing the innate capabilities of the poor and complements them with capacities (information, knowledge, skills, tools, finance and collectivization) to participate in the growing economy of the country.

In November 2015, the program was renamed Deendayal Antayodaya Yojana (DAY-NRLM).

NRLM Mission
"To reduce poverty by enabling the poor households to access gainful self-employment and skilled wage employment opportunities, resulting in appreciable improvement in their livelihoods on a sustainable basis, through building strong grassroots institutions of the poor."
NRLM Guiding Principles
  • Poor have a strong desire to come out of poverty, and they have innate capabilities
  • Social mobilization and building strong institutions of the poor is critical for unleashing the innate capabilities of the poor.
  • An external dedicated and sensitive support structure is required to induce the social mobilization, institution building and empowerment process.
  • Facilitating knowledge dissemination, skill building, access to credit, access to marketing, and access to other livelihoods services underpins this upward mobility.
Fetures
  • Universal Social Mobilization
  • Participatory Identification of Poor (PIP)
  • Community Funds as Resources in Perpetuity
  • Financial Inclusion
  • Livelihoods
  • Convergence and partnerships
  • Sensitive Support Structures

Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Grameen Kaushalya Yojana (DDU-GKY)
The Ministry of Rural Development (MoRD) announced the Deen Dayal Upadhyaya Grameen Kaushalya Yojana (DDU-GKY) Antyodaya Diwas, on 25th September 2014. DDU-GKY is a part of the National Rural Livelihood Mission (NRLM), tasked with the dual objectives of adding diversity to the incomes of rural poor families and cater to the career aspirations of rural youth.

Vission
"Transform rural poor youth into an economically independent and globally relevant workforce"
DDU-GKY is uniquely focused on rural youth between the ages of 15 and 35 years from poor families. As a part of the Skill India campaign, it plays an instrumental role in supporting the social and economic programs of the government like the Make In India, Digital India, Smart Cities and Start-Up India, Stand-Up India campaigns. Over 180 million or 69% of the country’s youth population between the ages of 18 and 34 years, live in its rural areas. Of these, the bottom of the pyramid youth from poor families with no or marginal employment number about 55 million.

DDU-GKY is present in 28 States and UTs, across 689 districts, impacting youth from over 7,426 blocks. It currently has over 1,575 projects being implemented by over 717 partners, in more than 502 trades from 50 industry sectors. Over 9.9 Lakh candidates have been trained and over 5.3 Lakh candidates have been placed in jobs as on 1st April, 2020. From 2012, DDU-GKY has so far committed an investment of more than INR 5,600 Crores, impacting rural youth pan-India.

Key features of DDU-GKY
  • Multi-Partner Approach:
    DDU-GKY is mindful that it must engage the support of multiple partners to ensure success and maximize on the investment made in time and resources. In order to energize and build mass support as well as create awareness amongst the rural youth, The DDU-GKY projects are market linked and implemented in PPP mode. The involvement and partnership between civil society organizations, Educational institutions, apex skill partners and regulating organizations, the Government and Private organizations, ensures that DDU-GKY can leverage on the strengths of all and achieve transformative change.
  • Focus on sustainability:
    Industry interactions have emphasised the need for training in soft skills, team working etc., as more important than domain skills, which they learn on the job. To ensure that candidates can perform in their work areas as well as assimilate into the organization and society, DDU-GKY has mandated a minimum of 160 hours of training in soft skills, function English and computer literacy. Additionally, a finishing module called Work Readiness training is suggested to ensure that trained candidates hit the ground running wherever they join.

    A retention strategy is just as important to us and we have put in place mechanisms to track performance post placement, salary top-ups to candidates through DBT, incentives to training partners for achievement of outcomes in retention & progression and a framework for the establishment and operations of a migration support centre.
  • Quality Assurance Framework:
    Introducing predictability in government process by defining minimum service level benchmarks and standards, controls & audits, defaults and remedial actions to reduce Inspector Raj in an all pervasive quality assurance framework comprising of the Guidelines & Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). The high point of the framework is inclusion and self-regulation, with assigned role and responsibilities for Q-Teams within the PIAs.

    Additionally, transparency and accountability is fostered through the end-to-end implementation of Public Financial Management System (PFMS) as the channel for fund disbursals and audits. This allows DDU-GKY to invest in capacity building of the private sector, front-loading 25% of the training costs so that PIAs are not constrained to invest in quality training centres.
  • Employing Technology in implementation:
    We understand the global and local importance of exposure to technology, and how it not only unites us, but also makes providing training and the monitoring and implementation of projects seamless. DDU-GKY through its training partners has employed the following
    • A Geo-Tagged Time Stamped Biometric Attendance Record: similar to what the candidates will eventually find in most organizations. This serves a dual purpose of being a monitoring tool, and also it also making candidates familiar with modern technology.
    • Provision of a Tablet PC per candidate at the training centre. This enables candidates to learn at their own pace.
    • Presence of Computer Labs and e-Learning at Training Centres, to ensure that all candidates have access to a wider curricula and adequate learning opportunities.
Digital India
E-governance initiatives in India took a broader dimension in the mid 1990s for wider sectoral applications with emphasis on citizen-centric services. The major ICT initiatives of the Government included, inter alia, some major projects, such as railway computerization, land record computerisation etc., which focused mainly on the development of information systems. Later on, many states started ambitious individual e-governance projects aimed at providing electronic services to citizens.

Though these e-governance projects were citizen-centric, they could make less than the desired impact due to their limited features. The isolated and less interactive systems revealed major gaps that were thwarting the successful adoption of e-governance along the entire spectrum of governance. They clearly pointed towards the need for a more comprehensive planning and implementation for the infrastructure required to be put in place, interoperability issues to be addressed etc., to establish a more connected government.

Vission
"The vision of Digital India programme is to transform India into a digitally empowered society and knowledge economy."


Approach and Methodology for Digital India programme are:
  • Ministries / Departments / States would fully leverage the Common and Support ICT Infrastructure established by GoI. DeitY would also evolve/ lay down standards and policy guidelines, provide technical and handholding support, undertake capacity building and R&D etc.
  • The existing/ ongoing e-governance initiatives would be suitably revamped to align them with the principles of Digital India. Scope enhancement, Process Reengineering, use of integrated & interoperable systems and deployment of emerging technologies like cloud & mobile would be undertaken to enhance the delivery of Government services to citizens.
  • States would be given flexibility to identify for inclusion additional state-specific projects, which are relevant for their socio-economic needs.
  • e-Governance would be promoted through a centralised initiative to the extent necessary, to ensure citizen-centric service orientation, interoperability of various e-Governance applications and optimal utilisation of ICT infrastructure/ resources, while adopting a decentralised implementation model.
  • Successes would be identified and their replication promoted proactively with the required productisation and customisation wherever needed.
  • Public Private Partnerships would be preferred wherever feasible to implement e-governance projects with adequate management and strategic control.
  • Adoption of Unique ID would be promoted to facilitate identification, authentication and delivery of benefits.
  • Restructuring of NIC would be undertaken to strengthen the IT support to all government departments at the Centre and the State levels.
  • The positions of Chief Information Officers (CIO) would be created in at least 10 key Ministries so that various e-governance projects could be designed, developed and implemented faster. CIO positions will be at Additional Secretary/Joint Secretary level with over-riding powers on IT in the respective Ministry.
Garib Kalyan Rojgar Yojna
Hon’ble Prime Minister, in his "Mann Ki Baat" address dated 31st May 2020, expressed the feelings of the nation about the hardships faced by the returning migrants and outlined the country’s resolve to provide employment and succor to such citizens.

The objectives of this 125 days Abhiyaan, with a resource envelop of Rs. 50,000 Crore are:
  • Provide livelihood opportunities to returning migrants and similarly affected rural citizens
  • Saturate villages with public infrastructure - Anganwadis, Panchayat Bhawans, Community Sanitary Complexes etc.
  • Set stage for enhancing longer term livelihood opportunities.
12 Participating Ministries / Departments
  1. Department of Rural Development
  2. Department of Drinking water and sanitation
  3. Ministry of Road Transport and Highway
  4. Ministry of Panchayati Raj
  5. Department of Telecommunication
  6. Department of New and Renewable Energy
  7. Ministry of Railways
  8. Minisiry of Mines
  9. Department of Agricultural Research and Education
  10. Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change
  11. Ministry of Petroleum
  12. Ministry of Defence
Focus on 25 Works / Activities
  1. Community Sanitary Complex
  2. Gram Panchayat Bhawan
  3. Works under Finance Commission funds
  4. National Highway works
  5. Water conservation & Harvesting works
  6. Construction of Wells
  7. Plantation (including through CAMPA Funds)
  8. Horticulture
  9. Anganwadi Centers
  10. Rural Housing(PMAY–Gramin)
  11. Rural connectivity (PMGSY) & Border road works
  12. Railway works
  13. Shyama Prasad Mukherjee RURBAN Mission
  14. PM KUSUM works
  15. Laying of Fiber Optic Cable under Bharat Net
  16. Works under Jal Jeevan Mission
  17. Works under PM Urja Ganga Project
  18. Training through KVKs for Livelihoods
  19. Works through District Mineral Fund
  20. Solid and Liquid waste management works
  21. Farm ponds
  22. Cattle sheds
  23. Goat Sheds
  24. Poultry sheds
  25. Vermicomposting
Program and Scheme
HRIDAY – Heritage City Development and Augmentation Yojana
Integrated Child Development Services
Janani Suraksha Yojana
Jawaharlal Nehru National Urban Renewal Mission (JnNURM)
Kishore Vaigyanik Protsahan Yojana
Livestock Insurance Scheme
Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Act
Members of Parliament Local Area Development Scheme
Midday Meal Scheme
Namami Gange Programme
National Career Service (India) (NCS)
National Child Labour Projects(NCLP)
National Food Security Mission
National Literacy Mission Programme
National Pension Scheme
National Rural Livelihood Mission (NRLM)
National Scheme on Welfare of Fishermen
National Social Assistance Scheme
National Urban Livelihood Mission (NULM)
Pradhan Mantri Awaas Yojana - Gramin
Pradhan Mantri Awaas Yojana - Urban
Pradhan Mantri Adarsh Gram Yojana
Pradhan Mantri Bhartiya Jan Aushadhi Kendra (PMBJK)
Pradhan Mantri Gram Sadak Yojana
Pradhan Mantri Jan Dhan Yojana
Pradhan Mantri Jeevan Jyoti Bima Yojana
Pradhan Mantri Kaushal Vikas Yojana
Pradhan Mantri Matritva Vandana Yojana
Pradhan Mantri Suraksha Bima Yojana
Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana
Rashtriya Krishi Vikas Yojana
Rashtriya Swasthya Bima Yojana
National TB Elimination Program (RNTCP)
Smart Cities Mission
Standup India
Sukanya Samridhi Yojana (Girl Child Prosperity Scheme)
Swamitva Yojana
Swarnajayanti Gram Swarozgar Yojana
Swavalamban
Unnat Jeevan by Affordable LEDs and Appliances for All(UJALA)
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